O'Donnell Group

O'Donnell Group
O'Donnell Group
Valerie O'Donnell
Honorary Group Leader
O'Donnell Group

Research Summary

Valerie is an Honorary Group Leader, currently based at the the University of Cardiff. She is working with Group Leaders in the Signalling Programme. Valerie’s research is focused on the study of bioactive lipids in circulating blood cells, particularly platelets.  She uses mass spectrometry to identify and characterise new signalling mediators. Since 2007, her group identified large families of lipids made by platelets, neutrophils and monocytes, and demonstrated that these are involved in innate immunity, blood clotting, cardiovascular disease and infection. Translational studies have established a role for these lipids in human thrombotic disease. 

She has developed new methods to quantify aminophospholipids at the platelet surface, for example molecular species of amino-phospholipids and oxidized phospholipids that comprise the pro-coagulant surface, which is essential for blot formation.  She leads/led a programme grant from British Heart Foundation (renewed 2020), and was an ERC Advanced Grant holder (2014-2019). Since 2017, she has been co-lead of LIPID MAPS, a multi-site Biomedical Resource supporting databases, tools, nomenclature and curation of lipids, funded by Wellcome Trust (>66K users, with Edward Dennis and Shankar Subramaniam (UCSD), Simon Andrews and Andrea Lopez, Babraham, and Bill Griffiths, Swansea).

She was Co-Director of the Systems Immunity Research Institute, Cardiff University from 2016-2020. She is co-investigator on an EU Marie Curie ITN (ArthritisHeal, Leiden), an EU Cost Network (EpiLipidNET) and an MRC Partnership Grant (MAP/UK, Imperial), and an Associate Group Lead at UK Dementia Research Institute (UKDRI) at Cardiff University. 

Latest Publications

Brailey PM, Evans L, López-Rodríguez JC, Sinadinos A, Tyrrel V, Kelly G, O'Donnell V, Ghazal P, John S, Barral P Signalling

Alterations in cellular metabolism underpin macrophage activation, yet little is known regarding how key immunological molecules regulate metabolic programs in macrophages. Here we uncover a function for the antigen presenting molecule CD1d in the control of lipid metabolism. We show that CD1d-deficient macrophages exhibit a metabolic reprogramming, with a downregulation of lipid metabolic pathways and an increase in exogenous lipid import. This metabolic rewiring primes macrophages for enhanced responses to innate signals, as CD1d-KO cells show higher signalling and cytokine secretion upon Toll-like receptor stimulation. Mechanistically, CD1d modulates lipid import by controlling the internalization of the lipid transporter CD36, while blocking lipid uptake through CD36 restores metabolic and immune responses in macrophages. Thus, our data reveal CD1d as a key regulator of an inflammatory-metabolic circuit in macrophages, independent of its function in the control of T cell responses.

+view abstract Nature communications, PMID: 36344546 07 Nov 2022

Brown JL, Peelor FF, Georgescu C, Wren JD, Kinter M, Tyrrell VJ, O'Donnell VB, Miller BF, Van Remmen H Signalling

Loss of innervation is a key driver of age associated muscle atrophy and weakness (sarcopenia). Our laboratory has previously shown that denervation induced atrophy is associated with the generation of mitochondrial hydroperoxides and lipid mediators produced downstream of cPLA and 12/15 lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX). To define the pathological impact of lipid hydroperoxides generated in denervation-induced atrophy in vivo, we treated mice with liproxstatin-1, a lipid hydroperoxide scavenger. We treated adult male mice with 5 mg/kg liproxstain-1 or vehicle one day prior to sciatic nerve transection and daily for 7 days post-denervation before tissue analysis. Liproxstatin-1 treatment protected gastrocnemius mass and fiber cross sectional area (∼40% less atrophy post-denervation in treated versus untreated mice). Mitochondrial hydroperoxide generation was reduced 80% in vitro and by over 65% in vivo by liproxstatin-1 treatment in denervated permeabilized muscle fibers and decreased the content of 4-HNE by ∼25% post-denervation. Lipidomic analysis revealed detectable levels of 25 oxylipins in denervated gastrocnemius muscle and significantly increased levels for eight oxylipins that are generated by metabolism of fatty acids through 12/15-LOX. Liproxstatin-1 treatment reduced the level of three of the eight denervation-induced oxylipins, specifically 15-HEPE, 13-HOTrE and 17-HDOHE. Denervation elevated protein degradation rates in muscle and treatment with liproxstatin-1 reduced rates of protein breakdown in denervated muscle. In contrast, protein synthesis rates were unchanged by denervation. Targeted proteomics revealed a number of proteins with altered expression after denervation but no effect of liproxstain-1. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 203 differentially expressed genes in denervated muscle from vehicle or liproxstatin-1 treated mice, including ER stress, nitric oxide signaling, Gαi signaling, glucocorticoid receptor signaling, and other pathways. Overall, these data suggest lipid hydroperoxides and oxylipins are key drivers of increased protein breakdown and muscle loss associated with denervation induced atrophy and a potential target for sarcopenia intervention.

+view abstract Redox biology, PMID: 36283174 20 Oct 2022

Protty MB, Jenkins PV, Collins PW, O'Donnell VB Signalling

Phospholipids (PLs) are found in all cell types and are required for structural support and cell activation signalling pathways. In resting cells, PLs are asymmetrically distributed throughout the plasma membrane with native procoagulant aminophospholipids (aPLs) being actively maintained in the inner leaflet of the membrane. Upon platelet activation, aPLs rapidly externalize to the outer leaflet and are essential for supporting the coagulation cascade by providing binding sites for factors in the cell-based model. More recent work has uncovered a role for enzymatically oxidized PLs (eoxPLs) in facilitating coagulation, working in concert with native aPLs. Despite this, the role of aPLs and eoxPLs in thrombo-inflammatory conditions, such as arterial and venous thrombosis, has not been fully elucidated. In this review, we describe the biochemical structures, distribution and regulation of aPL externalization and summarize the literature on eoxPL generation in circulating blood cells. We focus on the currently understood role of these lipids in mediating coagulation reactions , and in human thrombotic disease. Finally, we highlight gaps in our understanding in how these lipids vary in health and disease, which may place them as future therapeutic targets for the management of thrombo-inflammatory conditions.

+view abstract Open biology, PMID: 35440201 Apr 2022

Group Members

Valerie O'Donnell

Honorary Group Leader