Life Sciences Research for Lifelong Health

Simon Andrews

Simon Andrews did his first degree in Microbiology at the University of Warwick.  After a breif period working for Sandoz pharmaceuticals he went on  to do a PhD in protein engineering a the University of Newcastle with Harry Gilbert.  During his PhD his interests moved from bench work toward the emerging field of bioinformatics, and he decided to follow this direction in his future career.

After completing his PhD Simon worked with the BBSRC IT Services where he developed and then presented a series of bioinformatics training courses in protein structure analysis to the BBSRC institutes.  At one of these courses at Babraham he met John Coadwell who establised the Babraham bioinformatics group and was then employed as the second member of the bioinformatics team.  Since joining Babraham Simon has seen the group grow from two people to nine as the field has become far more prominent in the biological research community.  He took over the running of the group in 2010.

Latest Publications

MicroRNA-155 is essential for the optimal proliferation and survival of plasmablast B cells.
Arbore G, Henley T, Biggins L, Andrews S, Vigorito E, Turner M, Leyland R

A fast antibody response can be critical to contain rapidly dividing pathogens. This can be achieved by the expansion of antigen-specific B cells in response to T-cell help followed by differentiation into plasmablasts. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is required for optimal T-cell-dependent extrafollicular responses via regulation of PU.1, although the cellular processes underlying this defect are largely unknown. Here, we show that miR-155 regulates the early expansion of B-blasts and later on the survival and proliferation of plasmablasts in a B-cell-intrinsic manner, by tracking antigen-specific B cells in vivo since the onset of antigen stimulation. In agreement, comparative analysis of the transcriptome of miR-155-sufficient and miR-155-deficient plasmablasts at the peak of the response showed that the main processes regulated by miR-155 were DNA metabolic process, DNA replication, and cell cycle. Thus, miR-155 controls the extent of the extrafollicular response by regulating the survival and proliferation of B-blasts, plasmablasts and, consequently, antibody production.

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Life science alliance, 2, 2575-1077, , 2019

PMID: 31097471

FastQ Screen: A tool for multi-genome mapping and quality control.
Wingett SW, Andrews S

DNA sequencing analysis typically involves mapping reads to just one reference genome. Mapping against multiple genomes is necessary, however, when the genome of origin requires confirmation. Mapping against multiple genomes is also advisable for detecting contamination or for identifying sample swaps which, if left undetected, may lead to incorrect experimental conclusions. Consequently, we present FastQ Screen, a tool to validate the origin of DNA samples by quantifying the proportion of reads that map to a panel of reference genomes. FastQ Screen is intended to be used routinely as a quality control measure and for analysing samples in which the origin of the DNA is uncertain or has multiple sources.

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F1000Research, 7, 2046-1402, 1338, 2018

PMID: 30254741

Publisher Correction: TDP-43 gains function due to perturbed autoregulation in a Tardbp knock-in mouse model of ALS-FTD.
White MA, Kim E, Duffy A, Adalbert R, Phillips BU, Peters OM, Stephenson J, Yang S, Massenzio F, Lin Z, Andrews S, Segonds-Pichon A, Metterville J, Saksida LM, Mead R, Ribchester RR, Barhomi Y, Serre T, Coleman MP, Fallon JR, Bussey TJ, Brown RH, Sreedharan J

In the version of this article initially published, the footnote number 17 was missing from the author list for the two authors who contributed equally. Also, the authors have added a middle initial for author Justin R. Fallon and an acknowledgement to the Babraham Institute Imaging Facility and Sequencing Core Facility. The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

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Nature neuroscience, , 1546-1726, , 2018

PMID: 29872124

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Latest Publications

MicroRNA-155 is essential for the optimal proliferation and survival of plasmablast B cells.

Arbore G, Henley T, Biggins L

Life science alliance
2 2575-1077: (2019)

PMID: 31097471

FastQ Screen: A tool for multi-genome mapping and quality control.

Wingett SW, Andrews S

F1000Research
7 2046-1402:1338 (2018)

PMID: 30254741

TDP-43 gains function due to perturbed autoregulation in a Tardbp knock-in mouse model of ALS-FTD.

White MA, Kim E, Duffy A

Nature neuroscience
1546-1726: (2018)

PMID: 29556029

MLL2 conveys transcription-independent H3K4 trimethylation in oocytes.

Hanna CW, Taudt A, Huang J

Nature structural & molecular biology
25 1545-9985:73-82 (2018)

PMID: 29323282

An endosiRNA-Based Repression Mechanism Counteracts Transposon Activation during Global DNA Demethylation in Embryonic Stem Cells.

Berrens RV, Andrews S, Spensberger D

Cell stem cell
21 1875-9777:694-703.e7 (2017)

PMID: 29100015

Transcription and chromatin determinants of de novo DNA methylation timing in oocytes.

Gahurova L, Tomizawa SI, Smallwood SA

Epigenetics & chromatin
10 1756-8935:25 (2017)

PMID: 28507606

Gender Differences in Global but Not Targeted Demethylation in iPSC Reprogramming.

Milagre I, Stubbs TM, King MR

Cell reports
18 2211-1247:1079-1089 (2017)

PMID: 28147265