Publications

The Babraham Institute Publications database contains details of all publications resulting from our research groups and scientific services.

Individual publications are linked to the website of the journal - subscriptions may be required to view the full text. The database also includes Open Access publications, which can be identified by the icons found on search results.

Open Access symbol We are working to provide Open Access to as many publications as possible. 'Green' Open Access publications are marked by the pink 'Download' icon. Click on the icon to access a pre-print PDF version of the publication. ​'Gold' Open Access publications have the gold open padlock icon. You can read the full version of these papers on the publishing journal’s website without a subscription.

Title / Authors / Details Open Access Download

Data Management in Computational Systems Biology: Exploring Standards, Tools, Databases, and Packaging Best Practices.
Stanford NJ, Scharm M, Dobson PD, Golebiewski M, Hucka M, Kothamachu VB, Nickerson D, Owen S, Pahle J, Wittig U, Waltemath D, Goble C, Mendes P, Snoep J

Computational systems biology involves integrating heterogeneous datasets in order to generate models. These models can assist with understanding and prediction of biological phenomena. Generating datasets and integrating them into models involves a wide range of scientific expertise. As a result these datasets are often collected by one set of researchers, and exchanged with others researchers for constructing the models. For this process to run smoothly the data and models must be FAIR-findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. In order for data and models to be FAIR they must be structured in consistent and predictable ways, and described sufficiently for other researchers to understand them. Furthermore, these data and models must be shared with other researchers, with appropriately controlled sharing permissions, before and after publication. In this chapter we explore the different data and model standards that assist with structuring, describing, and sharing. We also highlight the popular standards and sharing databases within computational systems biology.

+ View Abstract

Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) , 2049 , 1940-6029 , 2019

PMID: 31602618

Diverse Human V antibody fragments with bio-therapeutic properties from the Crescendo Mouse.
Teng Y, Young JL, Edwards B, Hayes P, Thompson L, Johnston C, Edwards C, Sanders Y, Writer M, Pinto D, Zhang Y, Roode M, Chovanec P, Matheson L, Corcoran AE, Fernandez A, Montoliu L, Rossi B, Tosato V, Gjuracic K, Nikitin D, Bruschi C, McGuinness B, Sandal T, Romanos M

We describe the 'Crescendo Mouse', a human V transgenic platform combining an engineered heavy chain locus with diverse human heavy chain V, D and J genes, a modified mouse Cγ1 gene and complete 3' regulatory region, in a triple knock-out (TKO) mouse background devoid of endogenous immunoglobulin expression. The addition of the engineered heavy chain locus to the TKO mouse restored B cell development, giving rise to functional B cells that responded to immunization with a diverse response that comprised entirely 'heavy chain only' antibodies. Heavy chain variable (V) domain libraries were rapidly mined using phage display technology, yielding diverse high-affinity human V that had undergone somatic hypermutation, lacked aggregation and showed enhanced expression in E. coli. The Crescendo Mouse produces human V fragments, or Humabody® V, with excellent bio-therapeutic potential, as exemplified here by the generation of antagonistic Humabody® V specific for human IL17A and IL17RA.

+ View Abstract

New biotechnology , , 1876-4347 , 2019

PMID: 31600579

Longitudinal In Vivo Assessment of Host-Microbe Interactions in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Aspergillosis.
Saini S, Poelmans J, Korf H, Dooley JL, Liang S, Manshian BB, Verbeke R, Soenen SJ, Vande Velde G, Lentacker I, Lagrou K, Liston A, Gysemans C, De Smedt SC, Himmelreich U

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is ubiquitous in nature and the most common cause of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with a compromised immune system. The development of IPA in patients under immunosuppressive treatment or in patients with primary immunodeficiency demonstrates the importance of the host immune response in controlling aspergillosis. However, study of the host-microbe interaction has been hampered by the lack of tools for their non-invasive assessment. We developed a methodology to study the response of the host's immune system against IPA longitudinally in vivo by using fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging (F MRI). We showed the advantage of a perfluorocarbon-based contrast agent for the in vivo labeling of macrophages and dendritic cells, permitting quantification of pulmonary inflammation in different murine IPA models. Our findings reveal the potential of F MRI for the assessment of rapid kinetics of innate immune response against IPA and the permissive niche generated through immunosuppression.

+ View Abstract

iScience , 20 , 2589-0042 , 2019

PMID: 31581067

Open Access

Voices in methods development.
Anikeeva P, Boyden E, Brangwynne C, Cissé II, Fiehn O, Fromme P, Gingras AC, Greene CS, Heard E, Hell SW, Hillman E, Jensen GJ, Karchin R, Kiessling LL, Kleinstiver BP, Knight R, Kukura P, Lancaster MA, Loman N, Looger L, Lundberg E, Luo Q, Miyawaki A, Myers EW, Nolan GP, Picotti P, Reik W, Sauer M, Shalek AK, Shendure J, Slavov N, Tanay A, Troyanskaya O, van Valen D, Wang HW, Yi C, Yin P, Zernicka-Goetz M, Zhuang X

Nature methods , 16 , 1548-7105 , 2019

PMID: 31562479

Ageing affects DNA methylation drift and transcriptional cell-to-cell variability in mouse muscle stem cells.
Hernando-Herraez I, Evano B, Stubbs T, Commere PH, Jan Bonder M, Clark S, Andrews S, Tajbakhsh S, Reik W

Age-related tissue alterations have been associated with a decline in stem cell number and function. Although increased cell-to-cell variability in transcription or epigenetic marks has been proposed to be a major hallmark of ageing, little is known about the molecular diversity of stem cells during ageing. Here we present a single cell multi-omics study of mouse muscle stem cells, combining single-cell transcriptome and DNA methylome profiling. Aged cells show a global increase of uncoordinated transcriptional heterogeneity biased towards genes regulating cell-niche interactions. We find context-dependent alterations of DNA methylation in aged stem cells. Importantly, promoters with increased methylation heterogeneity are associated with increased transcriptional heterogeneity of the genes they drive. These results indicate that epigenetic drift, by accumulation of stochastic DNA methylation changes in promoters, is associated with the degradation of coherent transcriptional networks during stem cell ageing. Furthermore, our observations also shed light on the mechanisms underlying the DNA methylation clock.

+ View Abstract

Nature communications , 10 , 2041-1723 , 2019

PMID: 31554804

Open Access

Transcription factors make the right contacts.
Rugg-Gunn PJ

Nature cell biology , , 1476-4679 , 2019

PMID: 31548607

The Parkinson's gene PINK1 activates Akt via PINK1 kinase-dependent regulation of the phospholipid PI(3,4,5)P.
Furlong RM, Lindsay A, Anderson KE, Hawkins PT, Sullivan AM, O'Neill C

Akt signalling is central to cell survival, metabolism, protein and lipid homeostasis, and is impaired in Parkinson's disease(PD). Akt activation is reduced in the PD brain, and by many PD-causing genes, including PINK1(PTEN-induced putative kinase-1). This study investigated the mechanisms by which PINK1 regulates Akt signalling. Our results reveal for the first time that PINK1 constitutively activates Akt in a PINK1-kinase dependent manner in the absence of growth factors, and enhances Akt activation in normal growth medium. In PINK1 modified MEFs, agonist-induced Akt signalling failed in the absence of PINK1, due to significantly impaired PINK1 kinase-dependent increases in PI(3,4,5)P at both plasma membrane and Golgi. In the absence of PINK1, PI(3,4,5)P levels did not increase in the Golgi, and there was significant Golgi fragmentation, a recognised characteristic of PD neuropathology. PINK1 kinase activity protected the Golgi from fragmentation in an Akt-dependent fashion. This study demonstrates a new role for PINK1 as a primary upstream activator of Akt via PINK1 kinase-dependent regulation of its primary activator PI(3,4,5)P, providing novel mechanistic information on how loss of PINK1 impairs Akt signalling in PD.

+ View Abstract

Journal of cell science , 1 , 1477-9137 , 2019

PMID: 31540955

Open Access

Mechanisms of early placental development in mouse and humans.
Hemberger M, Hanna CW, Dean W

The importance of the placenta in supporting mammalian development has long been recognized, but our knowledge of the molecular, genetic and epigenetic requirements that underpin normal placentation has remained remarkably under-appreciated. Both the in vivo mouse model and in vitro-derived murine trophoblast stem cells have been invaluable research tools for gaining insights into these aspects of placental development and function, with recent studies starting to reshape our view of how a unique epigenetic environment contributes to trophoblast differentiation and placenta formation. These advances, together with recent successes in deriving human trophoblast stem cells, open up new and exciting prospects in basic and clinical settings that will help deepen our understanding of placental development and associated disorders of pregnancy.

+ View Abstract

Nature reviews. Genetics , , 1471-0064 , 2019

PMID: 31534202

IL-7R is essential for leukemia-initiating cell activity and pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
González-García S, Mosquera M, Fuentes P, Palumbo T, Escudero A, Pérez-Martínez A, Ramírez M, Corcoran AE, Toribio ML

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy resulting from the dysregulation of signaling pathways that control intrathymic T-cell development. Relapse rates are still significant and prognosis is particularly bleak for relapsed patients. Therefore, development of novel therapies specifically targeting pathways controlling leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) activity is mandatory for fighting refractory T-ALL. The interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) is a crucial T-cell developmental pathway commonly expressed in T-ALL, which has been implicated in leukemia progression. However, the significance of IL-7R/IL-7 signaling in T-ALL pathogenesis and its contribution to disease relapse remain unknown. To directly explore whether IL-7R targeting may be therapeutically efficient against T-ALL relapse, we focused here on a known Notch1-induced T-ALL model, since a majority of T-ALL patients harbor activating mutations in , which is a transcriptional regulator of IL-7R expression. Using loss-of-function approaches, we show that -deficient, but not wild type, mouse hematopoietic progenitors transduced with constitutively active Notch1 failed to generate leukemia upon transplantation into immunodeficient mice, thus providing formal evidence that IL-7R function is essential for Notch1-induced T-cell leukemogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-7R expression is an early functional biomarker of T-ALL cells with LIC potential, and demonstrate that impaired IL-7R signaling hampers engraftment and progression of patient-derived T-ALL xenografts. Notably, we show that IL-7R-dependent LIC activity and leukemia progression can be extended to human B-ALL. These results have important therapeutic implications, highlighting the relevance that targeting normal IL-7R signaling may have in future therapeutic interventions, particularly for preventing T-ALL (and B-ALL) relapse.

+ View Abstract

Blood , , 1528-0020 , 2019

PMID: 31530562

Rapid signalling responses via the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, GPER, in a hippocampal cell line.
Evans PD

The rapid non-genomic actions of 17β-estradiol in multiple tissues, including the nervous system, may involve the activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor, GPER. Different signalling pathways have been suggested to be activated by GPER in different cell lines and tissues. Controversially, GPER has also been suggested to be activated by the mineralocorticoid aldosterone, and by the non-steroidal diphenylacrylamide compound, STX, in some preparations. Evidence for the ability of the GPER agonist, G-1, and for aldosterone in the presence of the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, eplerenone, to potentiate forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in the hippocampal clonal cell line, mHippoE-18 is reviewed. The effects of both agents are blocked by the GPER antagonist G36, by PTX, (suggesting the involvement of Gi/o G proteins), by BAPTA-AM, (suggesting they are calcium sensitive), by wortmannin (suggesting an involvement of PI3Kinase) and by soluble amyloid-β peptides. STX also stimulates cyclic AMP levels in mHippoE-18 cells and these effects are blocked by G36 and PTX, as well as by amyloid-β peptides. This suggests that both aldosterone and STX may be capable of activating GPER in mHippoE-18 cells. Possible molecular mechanisms that may underlie these effects are discussed, together with possible forward directions for research on rapid non-genomic signalling by GPER, emphasising the importance of understanding the spatio-temporal aspects of its signalling in various tissues.

+ View Abstract

Steroids , 152 , 1878-5867 , 2019

PMID: 31499073

Genome-Wide Measurement and Computational Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding and Chromatin Accessibility in Lymphocytes.
Sadiyah MF, Roychoudhuri R

Cells of the adaptive immune system, including CD4 and CD8 T cells, as well as B cells, possess the ability to undergo dynamic changes in population size, differentiation state, and function to counteract diverse and temporally stochastic threats from the external environment. To achieve this, lymphocytes must be able to rapidly control their gene-expression programs in a cell-type-specific manner and in response to extrinsic signals. Such capacity is provided by transcription factors (TFs), which bind to the available repertoire of regulatory DNA elements in distinct lymphocyte subsets to program cell-type-specific gene expression. Here we provide a set of protocols that utilize massively parallel sequencing-based approaches to map genome-wide TF-binding sites and accessible chromatin, with consideration of the unique aspects and technical issues facing their application to lymphocytes. We show how to computationally validate and analyze aligned data to map differentially enriched/accessible sites, identify enriched DNA sequence motifs, and detect the position of nucleosomes adjacent to accessible DNA elements. These techniques, when applied to immune cells, can enhance our understanding of how gene-expression programs are controlled within lymphocytes to coordinate immune function in homeostasis and disease. © 2019 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

+ View Abstract

Current protocols in immunology , 126 , 1934-368X , 2019

PMID: 31483104

Selective deployment of transcription factor paralogs with submaximal strength facilitates gene regulation in the immune system.
Bruno L, Ramlall V, Studer RA, Sauer S, Bradley D, Dharmalingam G, Carroll T, Ghoneim M, Chopin M, Nutt SL, Elderkin S, Rueda DS, Fisher AG, Siggers T, Beltrao P, Merkenschlager M

In multicellular organisms, duplicated genes can diverge through tissue-specific gene expression patterns, as exemplified by highly regulated expression of RUNX transcription factor paralogs with apparent functional redundancy. Here we asked what cell-type-specific biologies might be supported by the selective expression of RUNX paralogs during Langerhans cell and inducible regulatory T cell differentiation. We uncovered functional nonequivalence between RUNX paralogs. Selective expression of native paralogs allowed integration of transcription factor activity with extrinsic signals, while non-native paralogs enforced differentiation even in the absence of exogenous inducers. DNA binding affinity was controlled by divergent amino acids within the otherwise highly conserved RUNT domain and evolutionary reconstruction suggested convergence of RUNT domain residues toward submaximal strength. Hence, the selective expression of gene duplicates in specialized cell types can synergize with the acquisition of functional differences to enable appropriate gene expression, lineage choice and differentiation in the mammalian immune system.

+ View Abstract

Nature immunology , 20 , 1529-2916 , 2019

PMID: 31451789

Targeting of early endosomes by autophagy facilitates EGFR recycling and signalling.
Fraser J, Simpson J, Fontana R, Kishi-Itakura C, Ktistakis NT, Gammoh N

Despite recently uncovered connections between autophagy and the endocytic pathway, the role of autophagy in regulating endosomal function remains incompletely understood. Here, we find that the ablation of autophagy-essential players disrupts EGF-induced endocytic trafficking of EGFR. Cells lacking ATG7 or ATG16L1 exhibit increased levels of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P), a key determinant of early endosome maturation. Increased PI(3)P levels are associated with an accumulation of EEA1-positive endosomes where EGFR trafficking is stalled. Aberrant early endosomes are recognised by the autophagy machinery in a TBK1- and Gal8-dependent manner and are delivered to LAMP2-positive lysosomes. Preventing this homeostatic regulation of early endosomes by autophagy reduces EGFR recycling to the plasma membrane and compromises downstream signalling and cell survival. Our findings uncover a novel role for the autophagy machinery in maintaining early endosome function and growth factor sensing.

+ View Abstract

EMBO reports , , 1469-3178 , 2019

PMID: 31448519

Open Access

NAD cleavage activity by animal and plant TIR domains in cell death pathways.
Horsefield S, Burdett H, Zhang X, Manik MK, Shi Y, Chen J, Qi T, Gilley J, Lai JS, Rank MX, Casey LW, Gu W, Ericsson DJ, Foley G, Hughes RO, Bosanac T, von Itzstein M, Rathjen JP, Nanson JD, Boden M, Dry IB, Williams SJ, Staskawicz BJ, Coleman MP, Ve T, Dodds PN, Kobe B

SARM1 (sterile alpha and TIR motif containing 1) is responsible for depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized form (NAD) during Wallerian degeneration associated with neuropathies. Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors recognize pathogen effector proteins and trigger localized cell death to restrict pathogen infection. Both processes depend on closely related Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains in these proteins, which, as we show, feature self-association-dependent NAD cleavage activity associated with cell death signaling. We further show that SARM1 SAM (sterile alpha motif) domains form an octamer essential for axon degeneration that contributes to TIR domain enzymatic activity. The crystal structures of ribose and NADP (the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) complexes of SARM1 and plant NLR RUN1 TIR domains, respectively, reveal a conserved substrate binding site. NAD cleavage by TIR domains is therefore a conserved feature of animal and plant cell death signaling pathways.

+ View Abstract

Science (New York, N.Y.) , 365 , 1095-9203 , 2019

PMID: 31439792

Epigenetic Regulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by Histone H3 Lysine 9 Dimethylation Attenuates Target Gene-Induction by Inflammatory Signaling.
Harman JL, Dobnikar L, Chappell J, Stokell BG, Dalby A, Foote K, Finigan A, Freire-Pritchett P, Taylor AL, Worssam MD, Madsen RR, Loche E, Uryga A, Bennett MR, Jørgensen HF

Vascular inflammation underlies cardiovascular disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) upregulate selective genes, including MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases) and proinflammatory cytokines upon local inflammation, which directly contribute to vascular disease and adverse clinical outcome. Identification of factors controlling VSMC responses to inflammation is therefore of considerable therapeutic importance. Here, we determine the role of Histone H3 lysine 9 di-methylation (H3K9me2), a repressive epigenetic mark that is reduced in atherosclerotic lesions, in regulating the VSMC inflammatory response. Approach and Results: We used VSMC-lineage tracing to reveal reduced H3K9me2 levels in VSMCs of arteries after injury and in atherosclerotic lesions compared with control vessels. Intriguingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed H3K9me2 enrichment at a subset of inflammation-responsive gene promoters, including MMP3, MMP9, MMP12, and IL6, in mouse and human VSMCs. Inhibition of G9A/GLP, the primary enzymes responsible for H3K9me2, significantly potentiated inflammation-induced gene induction in vitro and in vivo without altering NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell) and MAPK signaling. Rather, reduced G9A/GLP activity enhanced inflammation-induced binding of transcription factors NFκB-p65 and cJUN to H3K9me2 target gene promoters MMP3 and IL6. Taken together, these results suggest that promoter-associated H3K9me2 directly attenuates the induction of target genes in response to inflammation in human VSMCs.

+ View Abstract

Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology , 1 , 1524-4636 , 2019

PMID: 31434493

Open Access

A Negative Feedback Loop Regulates Integrin Inactivation and Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment to Inflammatory Sites.
McCormick B, Craig HE, Chu JY, Carlin LM, Canel M, Wollweber F, Toivakka M, Michael M, Astier AL, Norton L, Lilja J, Felton JM, Sasaki T, Ivaska J, Hers I, Dransfield I, Rossi AG, Vermeren S

Neutrophils are abundant circulating leukocytes that are rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation in an integrin-dependent fashion. Contrasting with the well-characterized regulation of integrin activation, mechanisms regulating integrin inactivation remain largely obscure. Using mouse neutrophils, we demonstrate in this study that the GTPase activating protein ARAP3 is a critical regulator of integrin inactivation; experiments with Chinese hamster ovary cells indicate that this is not restricted to neutrophils. Specifically, ARAP3 acts in a negative feedback loop downstream of PI3K to regulate integrin inactivation. Integrin ligand binding drives the activation of PI3K and of its effectors, including ARAP3, by outside-in signaling. ARAP3, in turn, promotes localized integrin inactivation by negative inside-out signaling. This negative feedback loop reduces integrin-mediated PI3K activity, with ARAP3 effectively switching off its own activator, while promoting turnover of substrate adhesions. In vitro, ARAP3-deficient neutrophils display defective PIP3 polarization, adhesion turnover, and transendothelial migration. In vivo, ARAP3-deficient neutrophils are characterized by a neutrophil-autonomous recruitment defect to sites of inflammation.

+ View Abstract

Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) , 203 , 1550-6606 , 2019

PMID: 31427445

Open Access

Distinct Molecular Trajectories Converge to Induce Naive Pluripotency.
Stuart HT, Stirparo GG, Lohoff T, Bates LE, Kinoshita M, Lim CY, Sousa EJ, Maskalenka K, Radzisheuskaya A, Malcolm AA, Alves MRP, Lloyd RL, Nestorowa S, Humphreys P, Mansfield W, Reik W, Bertone P, Nichols J, Göttgens B, Silva JCR

Understanding how cell identity transitions occur and whether there are multiple paths between the same beginning and end states are questions of wide interest. Here we show that acquisition of naive pluripotency can follow transcriptionally and mechanistically distinct routes. Starting from post-implantation epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), one route advances through a mesodermal state prior to naive pluripotency induction, whereas another transiently resembles the early inner cell mass and correspondingly gains greater developmental potency. These routes utilize distinct signaling networks and transcription factors but subsequently converge on the same naive endpoint, showing surprising flexibility in mechanisms underlying identity transitions and suggesting that naive pluripotency is a multidimensional attractor state. These route differences are reconciled by precise expression of Oct4 as a unifying, essential, and sufficient feature. We propose that fine-tuned regulation of this "transition factor" underpins multidimensional access to naive pluripotency, offering a conceptual framework for understanding cell identity transitions.

+ View Abstract

Cell stem cell , , 1875-9777 , 2019

PMID: 31422912

An intergenic non-coding RNA promoter required for histone modifications in the human β-globin chromatin domain.
Debrand E, Chakalova L, Miles J, Dai YF, Goyenechea B, Dye S, Osborne CS, Horton A, Harju-Baker S, Pink RC, Caley D, Carter DRF, Peterson KR, Fraser P

Transcriptome analyses show a surprisingly large proportion of the mammalian genome is transcribed; much more than can be accounted for by genes and introns alone. Most of this transcription is non-coding in nature and arises from intergenic regions, often overlapping known protein-coding genes in sense or antisense orientation. The functional relevance of this widespread transcription is unknown. Here we characterize a promoter responsible for initiation of an intergenic transcript located approximately 3.3 kb and 10.7 kb upstream of the adult-specific human β-globin genes. Mutational analyses in β-YAC transgenic mice show that alteration of intergenic promoter activity results in ablation of H3K4 di- and tri-methylation and H3 hyperacetylation extending over a 30 kb region immediately downstream of the initiation site, containing the adult δ- and β-globin genes. This results in dramatically decreased expression of the adult genes through position effect variegation in which the vast majority of definitive erythroid cells harbor inactive adult globin genes. In contrast, expression of the neighboring ε- and γ-globin genes is completely normal in embryonic erythroid cells, indicating a developmentally specific variegation of the adult domain. Our results demonstrate a role for intergenic non-coding RNA transcription in the propagation of histone modifications over chromatin domains and epigenetic control of β-like globin gene transcription during development.

+ View Abstract

PloS one , 14 , 1932-6203 , 2019

PMID: 31412036

Open Access

Screening for genes that accelerate the epigenetic aging clock in humans reveals a role for the H3K36 methyltransferase NSD1.
Martin-Herranz DE, Aref-Eshghi E, Bonder MJ, Stubbs TM, Choufani S, Weksberg R, Stegle O, Sadikovic B, Reik W, Thornton JM

Epigenetic clocks are mathematical models that predict the biological age of an individual using DNA methylation data and have emerged in the last few years as the most accurate biomarkers of the aging process. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control the rate of such clocks. Here, we have examined the human epigenetic clock in patients with a variety of developmental disorders, harboring mutations in proteins of the epigenetic machinery.

+ View Abstract

Genome biology , 20 , 1474-760X , 2019

PMID: 31409373

Open Access

Aldosterone, STX and amyloid-β peptides modulate GPER (GPR30) signalling in an embryonic mouse hippocampal cell line (mHippoE-18).
Evans PD

The GPCR, GPER, mediates many of the rapid, non-genomic actions of 17β-estradiol in multiple tissues, including the nervous system. Controversially, it has also been suggested to be activated by aldosterone, and by the non-steroidal diphenylacrylamide compound, STX, in some preparations. Here, the ability of the GPER agonist, G-1, and aldosterone in the presence of the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, eplerenone, to potentiate forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in the hippocampal clonal cell line, mHippoE-18, are compared. Both stimulatory effects are blocked by the GPER antagonist G36, by PTX, (suggesting the involvement of Gi/o G proteins), by BAPTA-AM, (suggesting they are calcium sensitive), by wortmannin (suggesting an involvement of PI3Kinase) and by soluble amyloid-β peptides. STX also stimulates cyclic AMP levels in mHippoE-18 cells and these effects are blocked by G36 and PTX, as well as by amyloid-β peptides. This suggests that both aldosterone and STX may modulate GPER signalling in mHippoE-18 cells.

+ View Abstract

Molecular and cellular endocrinology , 496 , 1872-8057 , 2019

PMID: 31404576

Open Access

Progressing the care, husbandry and management of ageing mice used in scientific studies.
Wilkinson MJ, Selman C, McLaughlin L, Horan L, Hamilton L, Gilbert C, Chadwick C, Flynn JN

Driven by the longer lifespans of humans, particularly in Westernised societies, and the need to know more about 'healthy ageing', ageing mice are being used increasingly in scientific research. Many departments and institutes involved with ageing research have developed their own systems to determine intervention points for potential refinements and to identify humane end points. Several good systems are in use, but variations between them could contribute to poor reproducibility of the science achieved. Working with scientific and regulatory communities in the UK, we have reviewed the clinical signs observed in ageing mice and developed recommendations for enhanced monitoring, behaviour assessment, husbandry and veterinary interventions. We advocate that the default time point for enhanced monitoring should be 15 months of age, unless prior information is available. Importantly, the enhanced monitoring should cause no additional harms to the animals. Where a mouse strain is well characterised, the onset of age-related enhanced monitoring may be modified based on knowledge of the onset of an expected age-related clinical sign. In progeroid models where ageing is accelerated, enhanced monitoring may need to be brought forward. Information on the background strain must be considered, as it influences the onset of age-related clinical signs. The range of ageing models currently used means that there will be no 'one-size fits all' solution. Increased awareness of the issues will lead to more refined and consistent husbandry of ageing mice, and application of humane end points will help to reduce the numbers of animals maintained for longer than is scientifically justified.

+ View Abstract

Laboratory animals , , 1758-1117 , 2019

PMID: 31403890

ZFP57 regulation of transposable elements and gene expression within and beyond imprinted domains.
Shi H, Strogantsev R, Takahashi N, Kazachenka A, Lorincz MC, Hemberger M, Ferguson-Smith AC

KRAB zinc finger proteins (KZFPs) represent one of the largest families of DNA-binding proteins in vertebrate genomes and appear to have evolved to silence transposable elements (TEs) including endogenous retroviruses through sequence-specific targeting of repressive chromatin states. ZFP57 is required to maintain the post-fertilization DNA methylation memory of parental origin at genomic imprints. Here we conduct RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses in normal and ZFP57 mutant mouse ES cells to understand the relative importance of ZFP57 at imprints, unique and repetitive regions of the genome.

+ View Abstract

Epigenetics & chromatin , 12 , 1756-8935 , 2019

PMID: 31399135

Open Access

DNA methylation and mRNA expression of imprinted genes in blastocysts derived from an improved in vitro maturation method for oocytes from small antral follicles in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.
Saenz-de-Juano MD, Ivanova E, Romero S, Lolicato F, Sánchez F, Van Ranst H, Krueger F, Segonds-Pichon A, De Vos M, Andrews S, Smitz J, Kelsey G, Anckaert E

Does imprinted DNA methylation or imprinted gene expression differ between human blastocysts from conventional ovarian stimulation (COS) and an optimized two-step IVM method (CAPA-IVM) in age-matched polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients?

+ View Abstract

Human reproduction (Oxford, England) , 34 , 1460-2350 , 2019

PMID: 31398248

Dosage compensation plans: protein aggregation provides additional insurance against aneuploidy.
Samant RS, Masto VB, Frydman J

Gene dosage alterations caused by aneuploidy are a common feature of most cancers yet pose severe proteotoxic challenges. Therefore, cells have evolved various dosage compensation mechanisms to limit the damage caused by the ensuing protein level imbalances. For instance, for heteromeric protein complexes, excess nonstoichiometric subunits are rapidly recognized and degraded. In this issue of , Brennan et al. (pp. 1031-1047) reveal that sequestration of nonstoichiometric subunits into aggregates is an alternative mechanism for dosage compensation in aneuploid budding yeast and human cell lines. Using a combination of proteomic and genetic techniques, they found that excess proteins undergo either degradation or aggregation but not both. Which route is preferred depends on the half-life of the protein in question. Given the multitude of diseases linked to either aneuploidy or protein aggregation, this study could serve as a springboard for future studies with broad-spanning implications.

+ View Abstract

Genes & development , 33 , 1549-5477 , 2019

PMID: 31371460