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The Babraham Institute Publications database contains details of all publications resulting from our research groups and scientific facilities. Pre-prints by Institute authors can be viewed on the Institute's bioRxiv channel. We believe that free and open access to the outputs of publicly‐funded research offers significant social and economic benefits, as well as aiding the development of new research. We are working to provide Open Access to as many publications as possible and these can be identified below by the padlock icon. Where this hasn't been possible, subscriptions may be required to view the full text.
 

Gould SA, Gilley J, Ling K, Jafar-Nejad P, Rigo F, Coleman M

Activation of the pro-degenerative protein SARM1 after diverse physical and disease-relevant injuries causes programmed axon degeneration. Original studies indicate that substantially decreased SARM1 levels are required for neuroprotection. However, we demonstrate, in Sarm1 haploinsufficient mice, that lowering SARM1 levels by 50% delays programmed axon degeneration in vivo after sciatic nerve transection and partially prevents neurite outgrowth defects in mice lacking the pro-survival factor NMNAT2. In vitro, the rate of degeneration in response to traumatic, neurotoxic, and genetic triggers of SARM1 activation is also slowed. Finally, we demonstrate that Sarm1 antisense oligonucleotides decrease SARM1 levels by more than 50% in vitro, which delays or prevents programmed axon degeneration. Combining Sarm1 haploinsufficiency with antisense oligonucleotides further decreases SARM1 levels and prolongs protection after neurotoxic injury. These data demonstrate that axon protection occurs in a Sarm1 gene dose-responsive manner and that SARM1-lowering agents have therapeutic potential, making Sarm1-targeting antisense oligonucleotides a promising therapeutic strategy.

+view abstract Cell reports , PMID: 34910914

Huang TC, Wang YF, Vazquez-Ferrer E, Theofel I, Requena CE, Hanna CW, Kelsey G, Hajkova P Epigenetics

Stability of the epigenetic landscape underpins maintenance of the cell-type-specific transcriptional profile. As one of the main repressive epigenetic systems, DNA methylation has been shown to be important for long-term gene silencing; its loss leads to ectopic and aberrant transcription in differentiated cells and cancer. The developing mouse germ line endures global changes in DNA methylation in the absence of widespread transcriptional activation. Here, using an ultra-low-input native chromatin immunoprecipitation approach, we show that following DNA demethylation the gonadal primordial germ cells undergo remodelling of repressive histone modifications, resulting in a sex-specific signature in mice. We further demonstrate that Polycomb has a central role in transcriptional control in the newly hypomethylated germline genome as the genetic loss of Ezh2 leads to aberrant transcriptional activation, retrotransposon derepression and dramatic loss of developing female germ cells. This sex-specific effect of Ezh2 deletion is explained by the distinct landscape of repressive modifications observed in male and female germ cells. Overall, our study provides insight into the dynamic interplay between repressive chromatin modifications in the context of a developmental reprogramming system.

+view abstract Nature , PMID: 34880491

Rugg-Gunn PJ Epigenetics

Cell-surface proteins provide excellent biomarkers to identify specific cell types and resolve heterogeneous cell populations. The analysis of cell-surface proteins by flow cytometry produces robust and quantitative information with single-cell resolution, and allows live target cells to be purified and characterized or re-cultured. Studies using antibody screens, proteomics, and candidate analysis have identified a comprehensive set of proteins that are expressed on the surface of naïve and primed human pluripotent stem cells. These findings have led to the development of suitable protein markers and antibodies to accurately distinguish between these two cell types. Here, a detailed protocol is provided that uses multi-color flow cytometry to analyze cell-surface protein expression in naïve and primed human pluripotent stem cells. This method enables the unambiguous identification of pluripotent cell types and the opportunity to sort target cells including during cell state transitions. The protocol can be combined to additionally investigate the expression of reporter genes and other informative features, such as DNA content.

+view abstract Methods in molecular biology , PMID: 34870841

Bendall A, Semprich CI Epigenetics

Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-sequencing) facilitates the genome-wide mapping of DNA sequences that are enriched for specific chromatin-binding proteins or histone post-translational modifications. More recently developed chromatin profiling methods called Cleavage Under Targets and Release Using Nuclease (CUT&RUN) and Cleavage Under Targets and Tagmentation (CUT&Tag) have adapted the ChIP-sequencing approach to produce similar data from a smaller amount of starting material, and while overcoming many of the conventional drawbacks of ChIP-sequencing. Here, we present detailed protocols for ChIP-seq, CUT&RUN, and CUT&Tag to profile genome-wide protein-DNA interactions in naïve human pluripotent stem cells.

+view abstract Methods in molecular biology , PMID: 34870837

Rostovskaya M Epigenetics

Naïve and primed pluripotent stem cells resemble epiblast cells of the pre-implantation and post-implantation embryo, respectively. This chapter describes a simple experimental system for the efficient and consistent transition of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) from the naïve to the primed state, which is a process called capacitation. Naïve hPSCs after capacitation can be differentiated further to somatic lineages, thus reproducing the order of developmental events in the embryo. Protocols for the induction of neuroectoderm, definitive endoderm, and paraxial mesoderm from hPSCs after capacitation and also from conventionally derived primed hPSCs are included in the chapter. Importantly, hPSC capacitation closely recapitulates transcriptional, metabolic, signaling, and cell polarity changes in the epiblast of primate embryos, and therefore offers a unique in vitro model of human peri-implantation development.

+view abstract Methods in molecular biology , PMID: 34870834

Rostovskaya M Epigenetics

Naïve pluripotent stem cells are the in vitro counterparts of pre-implantation embryonic epiblast. During the last few years, several protocols for establishing and maintaining human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) with naïve features have been reported, and many of these protocols result in cell populations with different molecular characteristics. As such, choosing the most appropriate method for naïve hPSC maintenance can pose a significant challenge. This chapter presents an optimized system called PXGL for culturing naïve hPSCs. Naïve hPSCs robustly self-renew while retaining a normal karyotype in PXGL, and the protocol is reproducible across different cell lines and independent laboratories.

+view abstract Methods in molecular biology , PMID: 34870831

Loreto A, Angeletti C, Gu W, Osborne A, Nieuwenhuis B, Gilley J, Arthur-Farraj P, Merlini E, Amici A, Luo Z, Hartley-Tassell L, Ve T, Desrochers LM, Wang Q, Kobe B, Orsomando G, Coleman MP

Axon loss underlies symptom onset and progression in many neurodegenerative disorders. Axon degeneration in injury and disease is promoted by activation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-consuming enzyme SARM1. Here, we report a novel activator of SARM1, a metabolite of the pesticide and neurotoxin vacor. Removal of SARM1 completely rescues mouse neurons from vacor-induced neuron and axon death and . We present the crystal structure the SARM1 regulatory domain complexed with this activator, the vacor metabolite VMN, which as the most potent activator yet know is likely to support drug development for human SARM1 and NMNAT2 disorders. This study indicates the mechanism of neurotoxicity and pesticide action by vacor, raises important questions about other pyridines in wider use today, provides important new tools for drug discovery, and demonstrates that removing SARM1 can robustly block programmed axon death induced by toxicity as well as genetic mutation.

+view abstract eLife , PMID: 34870595

Staels F, Collignon T, Betrains A, Gerbaux M, Willemsen M, Humblet-Baron S, Liston A, Vanderschueren S, Schrijvers R Immunology

Inborn errors of immunity (IEI) are a heterogenous group of disorders driven by genetic defects that functionally impact the development and/or function of the innate and/or adaptive immune system. The majority of these disorders are thought to have polygenic background. However, the use of next-generation sequencing in patients with IEI has led to an increasing identification of monogenic causes, unravelling the exact pathophysiology of the disease and allowing the development of more targeted treatments. Monogenic IEI are not only seen in a pediatric population but also in adulthood, either due to the lack of awareness preventing childhood diagnosis or due to a delayed onset where (epi)genetic or environmental factors can play a role. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms accounting for adult-onset presentations and provide an overview of monogenic causes associated with adult-onset IEI.

+view abstract Frontiers in immunology , PMID: 34867986

Trefely S, Huber K, Liu J, Noji M, Stransky S, Singh J, Doan MT, Lovell CD, von Krusenstiern E, Jiang H, Bostwick A, Pepper HL, Izzo L, Zhao S, Xu JP, Bedi KC, Rame JE, Bogner-Strauss JG, Mesaros C, Sidoli S, Wellen KE, Snyder NW Epigenetics

Quantitative subcellular metabolomic measurements can explain the roles of metabolites in cellular processes but are subject to multiple confounding factors. We developed stable isotope labeling of essential nutrients in cell culture-subcellular fractionation (SILEC-SF), which uses isotope-labeled internal standard controls that are present throughout fractionation and processing to quantify acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters in subcellular compartments by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We tested SILEC-SF in a range of sample types and examined the compartmentalized responses to oxygen tension, cellular differentiation, and nutrient availability. Application of SILEC-SF to the challenging analysis of the nuclear compartment revealed a nuclear acyl-CoA profile distinct from that of the cytosol, with notable nuclear enrichment of propionyl-CoA. Using isotope tracing, we identified the branched chain amino acid isoleucine as a major metabolic source of nuclear propionyl-CoA and histone propionylation, thus revealing a new mechanism of crosstalk between metabolism and the epigenome.

+view abstract Molecular cell , PMID: 34856123

Merlini E, Coleman MP, Loreto A

Mitochondrial failure has long been associated with programmed axon death (Wallerian degeneration, WD), a widespread and potentially preventable mechanism of axon degeneration. While early findings in axotomised axons indicated that mitochondria are involved during the execution steps of this pathway, recent studies suggest that in addition, mitochondrial dysfunction can initiate programmed axon death without physical injury. As mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with disorders involving early axon loss, including Parkinson's disease, peripheral neuropathies, and multiple sclerosis, the findings that programmed axon death is activated by mitochondrial impairment could indicate the involvement of druggable mechanisms whose disruption may protect axons in such diseases. Here, we review the latest developments linking mitochondrial dysfunction to programmed axon death and discuss their implications for injury and disease.

+view abstract Trends in neurosciences , PMID: 34852932

Campbell S, Mesaros C, Izzo L, Affronti H, Noji M, Schaffer BE, Tsang T, Sun K, Trefely S, Kruijning S, Blenis J, Blair IA, Wellen KE Epigenetics

Tumors frequently exhibit aberrant glycosylation, which can impact cancer progression and therapeutic responses. The hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) produces uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), a major substrate for glycosylation in the cell. Prior studies have identified the HBP as a promising therapeutic target in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). The HBP requires both glucose and glutamine for its initiation. The PDA tumor microenvironment is nutrient poor, however, prompting us to investigate how nutrient limitation impacts hexosamine synthesis. Here, we identify that glutamine limitation in PDA cells suppresses de novo hexosamine synthesis but results in increased free GlcNAc abundance. GlcNAc salvage via N-acetylglucosamine kinase (NAGK) is engaged to feed UDP-GlcNAc pools. expression is elevated in human PDA, and deletion from PDA cells impairs tumor growth in mice. Together, these data identify an important role for NAGK-dependent hexosamine salvage in supporting PDA tumor growth.

+view abstract eLife , PMID: 34844667

Hsu CC, George JH, Waller S, Besnard C, Nagel DA, Hill EJ, Coleman MD, Korsunsky AM, Cui Z, Ye H

To reflect human development, it is critical to create a substrate that can support long-term cell survival, differentiation, and maturation. Hydrogels are promising materials for 3D cultures. However, a bulk structure consisting of dense polymer networks often leads to suboptimal microenvironments that impedes nutrient exchange and cell-to-cell interaction. Herein, granular hydrogel-based scaffolds were used to support 3D human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neural networks. A custom designed 3D printed toolset was developed to extrude hyaluronic acid hydrogel through a porous nylon fabric to generate hydrogel granules. Cells and hydrogel granules were combined using a weaker secondary gelation step, forming self-supporting cell laden scaffolds. At three and seven days, granular scaffolds supported higher cell viability compared to bulk hydrogels, whereas granular scaffolds supported more neurite bearing cells and longer neurite extensions (65.52 ± 11.59 μm) after seven days compared to bulk hydrogels (22.90 ± 4.70 μm). Long-term (three-month) cultures of clinically relevant hiPSC-derived neural cells in granular hydrogels supported well established neuronal and astrocytic colonies and a high level of neurite extension both inside and beyond the scaffold. This approach is significant as it provides a simple, rapid and efficient way to achieve a tissue-relevant granular structure within hydrogel cultures.

+view abstract Bioactive materials , PMID: 34820576

Joffrin AM, Saunders AM, Barneda D, Flemington V, Thompson AL, Sanganee HJ, Conway SJ Signalling

Synthetic phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PtdIns ) derivatives play a pivotal role in broadening our understanding of PtdIns metabolism. However, the development of such tools is reliant on efficient enantioselective and regioselective synthetic strategies. Here we report the development of a divergent synthetic route applicable to the synthesis of deuterated PtdIns4 and PtdIns5 derivatives. The synthetic strategy developed involves a key enzymatic desymmetrisation step using Lipozyme TL-IM®. In addition, we optimised the large-scale synthesis of deuterated -inositol, allowing for the preparation of a series of saturated and unsaturated deuterated PtdIns4 and PtdIns5 derivatives. Experiments in MCF7 cells demonstrated that these deuterated probes enable quantification of the corresponding endogenous phospholipids in a cellular setting. Overall, these deuterated probes will be powerful tools to help improve our understanding of the role played by PtdIns in physiology and disease.

+view abstract Chemical science , PMID: 34820112

Adamowski M, Wołodko K, Oliveira J, Castillo-Fernandez J, Murta D, Kelsey G, Galvão AM Epigenetics

Obesity leads to ovarian dysfunction and the establishment of local leptin resistance. The aim of our study was to characterize the levels of NOD-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation in ovaries and liver of mice during obesity progression. Furthermore, we tested the putative role of leptin on NLRP3 regulation in those organs. C57BL/6J female mice were treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for estrous cycle synchronization and ovary collection. In diet-induced obesity (DIO) protocol, mice were fed chow diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 or 16 weeks, whereas in the hyperleptinemic model (LEPT), mice were injected with leptin for 16 days (16 L) or saline (16 C). Finally, the genetic obese leptin-deficient (+/? and -/-) mice were fed CD for 4 week. Either ovaries and liver were collected, as well as cumulus cells (CCs) after superovulation from DIO and LEPT. The estrus cycle synchronization protocol showed increased protein levels of NLRP3 and interleukin (IL)-18 in diestrus, with this stage used for further sample collections. In DIO, protein expression of NLRP3 inflammasome components was increased in 4 week HFD, but decreased in 16 week HFD. Moreover, NLRP3 and IL-1β were upregulated in 16 L and downregulated in Transcriptome analysis of CC showed common genes between LEPT and 4 week HFD modulating NLRP3 inflammasome. Liver analysis showed NLRP3 protein upregulation after 16 week HFD in DIO, but also its downregulation in . We showed the link between leptin signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the ovary throughout obesity progression in mice, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underpinning ovarian failure in maternal obesity.

+view abstract Frontiers in cell and developmental biology , PMID: 34805147

Gilley J, Jackson O, Pipis M, Estiar MA, Al-Chalabi A, Danzi MC, van Eijk KR, Goutman SA, Harms MB, Houlden H, Iacoangeli A, Kaye J, Lima L, , Ravits J, Rouleau GA, Schüle R, Xu J, Zuchner S, Cooper-Knock J, Gan-Or Z, Reilly MM, Coleman MP

SARM1, a protein with critical NADase activity, is a central executioner in a conserved programme of axon degeneration. We report seven rare missense or in-frame microdeletion human variant alleles in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or other motor nerve disorders that alter the SARM1 auto-inhibitory ARM domain and constitutively hyperactivate SARM1 NADase activity. The constitutive NADase activity of these seven variants is similar to that of SARM1 lacking the entire ARM domain and greatly exceeds the activity of wild-type SARM1, even in the presence of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), its physiological activator. This rise in constitutive activity alone is enough to promote neuronal degeneration in response to otherwise non-harmful, mild stress. Importantly, these strong gain-of-function alleles are completely patient-specific in the cohorts studied and show a highly significant association with disease at the single gene level. These findings of disease-associated coding variants that alter SARM1 function build on previously reported genome-wide significant association with ALS for a neighbouring, more common intragenic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) to support a contributory role of SARM1 in these disorders. A broad phenotypic heterogeneity and variable age-of-onset of disease among patients with these alleles also raises intriguing questions about the pathogenic mechanism of hyperactive SARM1 variants.

+view abstract eLife , PMID: 34796871

Liston A, Humblet-Baron S, Duffy D, Goris A Immunology

The extreme diversity of the human immune system, forged and maintained throughout evolutionary history, provides a potent defense against opportunistic pathogens. At the same time, this immune variation is the substrate upon which a plethora of immune-associated diseases develop. Genetic analysis suggests that thousands of individually weak loci together drive up to half of the observed immune variation. Intense selection maintains this genetic diversity, even selecting for the introgressed Neanderthal or Denisovan alleles that have reintroduced variation lost during the out-of-Africa migration. Variations in age, sex, diet, environmental exposure, and microbiome each potentially explain the residual variation, with proof-of-concept studies demonstrating both plausible mechanisms and correlative associations. The confounding interaction of many of these variables currently makes it difficult to assign definitive contributions. Here, we review the current state of play in the field, identify the key unknowns in the causality of immune variation, and identify the multidisciplinary pathways toward an improved understanding.

+view abstract Nature immunology , PMID: 34795445

Garcia KKS, Abrahão AA

High-quality clinical research is dependent on adequate design, methodology, and data collection. The utilization of electronic data capture (EDC) systems is recommended to optimize research data through proper management. This paper's objective is to present the procedures of REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), which supports research development, and to promote the utilization of this software among the scientific community.

+view abstract Healthcare informatics research , PMID: 34788915

Holoch D, Wassef M, Lövkvist C, Zielinski D, Aflaki S, Lombard B, Héry T, Loew D, Howard M, Margueron R

Epigenetic inheritance of gene expression states enables a single genome to maintain distinct cellular identities. How histone modifications contribute to this process remains unclear. Using global chromatin perturbations and local, time-controlled modulation of transcription, we establish the existence of epigenetic memory of transcriptional activation for genes that can be silenced by the Polycomb group. This property emerges during cell differentiation and allows genes to be stably switched after a transient transcriptional stimulus. This transcriptional memory state at Polycomb targets operates in cis; however, rather than relying solely on read-and-write propagation of histone modifications, the memory is also linked to the strength of activating inputs opposing Polycomb proteins, and therefore varies with the cellular context. Our data and computational simulations suggest a model whereby transcriptional memory arises from double-negative feedback between Polycomb-mediated silencing and active transcription. Transcriptional memory at Polycomb targets thus depends not only on histone modifications but also on the gene-regulatory network and underlying identity of a cell.

+view abstract Nature genetics , PMID: 34782763

MacKenzie G, Subramaniam S, Caldwell LJ, Fitzgerald D, Harrison NA, Hong S, Irani SR, Khandaker GM, Liston A, Miron VE, Mondelli V, Morgan BP, Pariante C, Shah DK, Taams LS, Teeling JL, Upthegrove R Immunology

Neuroimmunology in the broadest sense is the study of interactions between the nervous and the immune systems. These interactions play important roles in health from supporting neural development, homeostasis and plasticity to modifying behaviour. Neuroimmunology is increasingly recognised as a field with the potential to deliver a significant positive impact on human health and treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. Yet, translation to the clinic is hindered by fundamental knowledge gaps on the underlying mechanisms of action or the optimal timing of an intervention, and a lack of appropriate tools to visualise and modulate both systems. Here we propose ten key disease-agnostic research questions that, if addressed, could lead to significant progress within neuroimmunology in the short to medium term. We also discuss four cross-cutting themes to be considered when addressing each question: i) bi-directionality of neuroimmune interactions; ii) the biological context in which the questions are addressed (e.g. health vs disease vs across the lifespan); iii) tools and technologies required to fully answer the questions; and iv) translation into the clinic. We acknowledge that these ten questions cannot represent the full breadth of gaps in our understanding; rather they focus on areas which, if addressed, may have the most broad and immediate impacts. By defining these neuroimmunology priorities, we hope to unite existing and future research teams, who can make meaningful progress through a collaborative and cross-disciplinary effort.

+view abstract Wellcome open research , PMID: 34778569

Osma-Garcia IC, Capitan-Sobrino D, Mouysset M, Bell SE, Lebeurrier M, Turner M, Diaz-Muñoz MD Immunology

The germinal centre (GC) is required for the generation of high affinity antibodies and immunological memory. Here we show that the RNA binding protein HuR has an essential function in GC B cells to sustain the GC response. In its absence, the GC reaction and production of high-affinity antibody is severely impaired. Mechanistically, HuR affects the transcriptome qualitatively and quantitatively. The expression and splicing patterns of hundreds of genes are altered in the absence of HuR. Among these genes, HuR is required for the expression of Myc and a Myc-dependent transcriptional program that controls GC B cell proliferation and Ig somatic hypermutation. Additionally, HuR regulates the splicing and abundance of mRNAs required for entry into and transition through the S phase of the cell cycle, and it modulates a gene signature associated with DNA deamination protecting GC B cells from DNA damage and cell death.

+view abstract Nature communications , PMID: 34772950

Lee JL, Linterman M Immunology

Vaccines are a highly effective intervention for conferring protection against infections and reducing the associated morbidity and mortality in vaccinated individuals. However, ageing is often associated with a functional decline in the immune system that results in poor antibody production in older individuals after vaccination. A key contributing factor of this age-related decline in vaccine efficacy is the reduced size and function of the germinal centre (GC) response. GCs are specialised microstructures where B cells undergo affinity maturation and diversification of their antibody genes, before differentiating into long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. The GC response requires the coordinated interaction of many different cell types, including B cells, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells and stromal cell subsets like follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). This review discusses how ageing affects different components of the GC reaction that contribute to its limited output and ultimately impaired antibody responses in older individuals after vaccination. An understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the age-related decline in the GC response is crucial in informing strategies to improve vaccine efficacy and extend the healthy lifespan among older people.

+view abstract Immunology letters , PMID: 34767859

Jacobs L, Yshii L, Junius S, Geukens N, Liston A, Hollevoet K, Declerck P Immunology

To improve the anti-tumor efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors, numerous combination therapies are under clinical evaluation, including with IL-12 gene therapy. The current study evaluated the simultaneous delivery of the cytokine and checkpoint-inhibiting antibodies by intratumoral DNA electroporation in mice. In the MC38 tumor model, combined administration of plasmids encoding IL-12 and an anti-PD-1 antibody induced significant anti-tumor responses, yet similar to the monotherapies. When treatment was expanded with a DNA-based anti-CTLA-4 antibody, this triple combination significantly delayed tumor growth compared to IL-12 alone and the combination of anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Despite low drug plasma concentrations, the triple combination enabled significant abscopal effects in contralateral tumors, which was not the case for the other treatments. The DNA-based immunotherapies increased T cell infiltration in electroporated tumors, especially of CD8 T cells, and upregulated the expression of CD8 effector markers. No general immune activation was detected in spleens following either intratumoral treatment. In B16F10 tumors, evaluation of the triple combination was hampered by a high sensitivity to control plasmids. In conclusion, intratumoral gene electrotransfer allowed effective combined delivery of multiple immunotherapeutics. This approach induced responses in treated and contralateral tumors, while limiting systemic drug exposure and potentially detrimental systemic immunological effects.

+view abstract Cancer gene therapy , PMID: 34754076

Garrison H, Agostinho M, Alvarez L, Bekaert S, Bengtsson L, Broglio E, Couso D, Araújo Gomes R, Ingram Z, Martinez E, Mena AL, Nickel D, Norman M, Pinheiro I, Solís-Mateos M, Bertero MG

Open Science calls for transparent science and involvement of various stakeholders. Here are examples of and advice for meaningful stakeholder engagement.

+view abstract EMBO reports , PMID: 34734669

Monkley S, Overed-Sayer C, Parfrey H, Rassl D, Crowther D, Escudero-Ibarz L, Davis N, Carruthers A, Berks R, Coetzee M, Kolosionek E, Karlsson M, Griffin LR, Clausen M, Belfield G, Hogaboam CM, Murray LA

The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a direct consequence of cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and a key disease driving mechanism in IPF. The resolution of the UPR is directed by PPP1R15A (GADD34) and leads to the restoration of normal ribosomal activity. While the role of PPP1R15A has been explored in lung epithelial cells, the role of this UPR resolving factor has yet to be explored in lung mesenchymal cells. The objective of the current study was to determine the expression and role of PPP1R15A in IPF fibroblasts and in a bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model. A survey of IPF lung tissue revealed that PPP1R15A expression was markedly reduced. Targeting PPP1R15A in primary fibroblasts modulated TGF-β-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation and exacerbated pulmonary fibrosis in bleomycin-challenged mice. Interestingly, the loss of PPP1R15A appeared to promote lung fibroblast senescence. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the major role of PPP1R15A in the regulation of lung mesenchymal cells, and regulation of PPP1R15A may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in IPF.

+view abstract Scientific reports , PMID: 34732748